Picture of my hand with a BG line chart in the backgroundCourtesy of the “Wayback Machine“, I bring you the early entries I made in my online diabetes journal.  This was back before Blogger made things easy, and I had to write the entries in HTML.  The journal is no longer available, but thanks to the wonderful tools available on the internet, I was able to find much of my old stuff.  I’d like to share one of the old entries with you.

High blood sugars still make me tired.
———————————————————————————————————————————–
27 May 2003

Blah! I feel like crap today. I woke up with a blood sugar of
390. That was at 8:00am. It’s now 11:22am, and It’s on it’s way down (356 at
last check).

The hard thing about such high blood sugars for me, is that
I get so incredibly sleepy. I mean SOOOOOOO sleepy. I could literaly fall asleep
on my feet. It is hard to stay awake while driving, walking, or anything else
for that matter. Much less trying to be productive at work. It’s really
tough.

Then, you also want to be careful about bringing your blood sugar
down too fast. First of all, your body does not like blood sugars outside of
it’s normal range (70-120). Second of all, nature does not change rapidly – so
your body does not like rapid change either. It’s just not good.

You
also have to be careful because it’s common to “over do it” on the insulin
because you feel so crappy with your blood sugar so high. But, if you try to fix
it too fast, you will feel even worse because you are changing your blood sugar
so rapidly, and you will often end up with a low blood sugar from being so
aggressive!

Then, the low blood sugars cause all types of things to
happen. Because a persons body normally never has a low blood sugar, the body
goes into a panic when the blood sugar is low. Among many other things, it dumps
a handfull of hormones to try to counter act the low blood sugar. Among those
are adrenaline, glucagon, cortisol and growth hormone. The last two, cortisol
and growth hormone don’t impact the blood sugar until many hours later. At which
time, you start having these high blood sugars that are hard to account for.
It’s a very complicated system, which works incredibly well – except if you’re
diabetic.

That’s all for now…

———————————————————————————————————————————–

Tagged with:
 

25 Responses to Wayback Wednesday – So Sleepy…

  1. Karen says:

    Holy Crap, I can’t believe that last comment. I have met Scott in person, and he is not FAT. I have eaten a meal with him and he does not eat seven cheeseburger. Diabetes is not something we have asked for. It is something that happened to us. We deal with it the best we can. We can do everything exactly as we are supposed to, and still wake up with a 300+ blood sugar. There are so many forces at work other than what we eat.
    I would hope we could all try to be supportive to one another in the bad times, as well as the good.

  2. TheresaJDRFneny says:

    The Professor needs to go back to health class. Thanks for encouraging the love today Karen…and thanks to Scott for the blog!

  3. So, Professor, do you know anything at all about type 1 diabetes? Do you know that Scott’s pancreas doesn’t make insulin any more? At all? Type 1 diabetes is not caused by being overweight, otherwise my 3 year-old daughter wouldn’t have been diagnosed with it 11 years ago. My friend’s 12 month-old son wouldn’t have been diagnosed with it. Even type 2 is not solely caused by being overweight. I have several friends who are quite thin, and have always been so, who have type 2. It’s ignorant people like you who make this disease even more difficult to deal with. It’s hard enough to handle fluctuating blood sugars without also having to re-educate a woefully uninformed and bigoted populace.

  4. Tony Rose says:

    @Professor – try just a little to be less ignorant. Seriously.
    @Scott – I have this happen too where I’ll have a really high number, take a bunch of insulin and test every 10 minutes expecting it to drop a 100 every time. I really hate the lows. I am trying to overcome the low fear to help average out my A1c’s to get a lower number. It’s just tough. As we’ve discussed, I typically “over do it” on the other end, when I’m low. The over compensate, take insulin and become low again cycle.
    These highs happen to every diabetic. I recently wrote about one of these unexplained highs…they suck. Keep your head up!

  5. Kerri. says:

    Dear Professor,
    Have you ever thought of exercising a little self-restraint and spellcheck? Perhaps having seven brain cells firing before posting instead of your usual … none?
    Cuddles,
    Kerri.

  6. Chris says:

    @Teacher’s Ass-istant
    I wonder what you hoped to accomplish by your comment. I wonder what you hope to accomplish in life. If those three sentences are any indicator, natural selection will be kind enough to spare us from your genes spreading that kind of ignorant filth in the future.
    Have a nice day.
    PS. I AM SPARTACUS!

  7. Allison says:

    Professor- If you can’t say anything nice, please don’t say anything at all. For real.
    Scott- You rock!

  8. rainbow_goddess says:

    Hey professor poppycock! Your name suits you because that is what your comment consists of. You obviously know nothing about diabetes in general, type 1 diabetes in particular, or about Scott himself.
    Currently dealing with a high BG myself and wishing I could make it come down right away instead of having to wait an hour or two.

  9. JaimieH says:

    ignorangutan …..someone who keenly offers on-the-fly explanation about topics they have no clue about

  10. George says:

    It’s sad that someone can come into a community, not knowing anyone, and treat someone whom many love and appreciate so horribly.
    Sleep well poopycock.

  11. Beth says:

    Wow, what a lovely comment, “Professor”.
    Perhaps you should “excercise” your right to keep your thoughts to yourself.

  12. k2 says:

    Scotty J: As always,your posts are spot on and YOU ROCK!
    Professor Crap In Your Pants -
    YOU

  13. Scott, we all love you. That person is a selfish, ignorant jerk.

  14. Jolie says:

    That HAD to be a joke, no way could someone really come here and say that…no way.
    Scott, I never knew there was a connection between my hunger and high numbers until I joined the diabetes community. I always just felt like a failure…”my numbers are high and I’m still putting something into my mouth!!!” Glad you put this out there so that others (especially newly dx’ed) understand that there is a connection.

  15. amylia says:

    I’m wiht Jolie, that comment had to be a joke, as is evidenced by the name. Scott, did you just get Punk’d or sumthin’? Odd…I had a comment by PP, too! WTF?
    Your post brings up such valid points. I mean, when I’m low, it sometimes feels like life or death, and I’d do anything to get my sugar back up so I’d eat seven hamburgers if they were there if I felt like It’d help me survive.
    This is why the pump helps so much because I am on much less of a roller coaster from lows then highs then lows, etc etc.
    Scott, you rock! Thanks for the way back post!

  16. leighton says:

    Overweight/Diabetes?consider the fact that there are over 100 different ways of contracting it so being overweight counts as less than 1% so to say narrow minded would be an understatement?All we can hope is that a little bit of money for stem cell recearch goes a long way but I’m sure that advances in that area will accelerate as soon as people become more acceptable to it when they realise that benefits are endless not to prolong life but to give everyone what they were due in the first place.

  17. Rachel says:

    Scott great post!!! Please ignore Professor Poppycock. I don’t know what is going on but the nuts are out!!! I started blogging on another site and I was blogging about diabetes. I have never been so insulted in my life. I’ve been told that I’m a bad mom for allowing my child to get diabetes, I was told that I was a s*upid c*nt…. it’s ridiculous!
    Please don’t let it bother you and just ignore it. Some people honestly just need to be beaten over the head.
    You are doing a great job. I appreciate your posts and your honesty. It’s extremely helpful to me! :)

  18. Elizabeth says:

    Wow, I can’t believe what I’m reading! Professor Poppycock obviously has some food issues him/herself otherwise he/she wouldn’t be reacting this way to you :)
    Scott,
    I hate the feeling you described of so desperately trying to get blood sugars down and not wanting to over-correct. It’s frustrating to say the least- and not something we can always help!

  19. katie says:

    i think you’re great, scott! thanks for your openness.

  20. Caro says:

    Hmmm… Professor Poppycock, perhaps you wrote this because you’re so THICK. Not to mention just plain nasty!
    Great post Scott. I certainly identify with those feelings.

  21. Cherise says:

    Profess PC-
    Please research diabetes! Scott your the BOMB! Btw, YOUR BLOG ROCKS!
    P.s.
    Can I have autograph? Your such a superstar:)

  22. Jill says:

    WOW! Once again… someone can’t post under their own name! They have to hide like a chicken! What a shame!
    Scott~ I’m so sorry that you’ve been insulted by such an idiot! I agree with everyone else…your blog ROCKS and I love the way you bring out old posts about how you were feeling. It helps me know that what Kacey is feeling is “normal” (as normal as it gets now) and gives me insight to what emotions she may run into as she gets older.
    Keep Blogging!! :)

  23. Anonymous says:

  24. 'Professor Poppycock' says:

    Couldn’t agree more with the previous poster….Still be fair, they did come in late and win the Second World War single-handedly didn’t they though.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>

Site last updated April 18, 2014 @ 7:52 AM; This content last updated April 18, 2014 @ 7:52 AM