It seems almost magical

I had a pretty interesting Symlin experience this morning.

I was running late.  I played basketball last night, was still tired, and slept in a bit longer than I should have.  Once I woke up, I was moving really slowly.  “Dragging Ass” as they say.

As reality started to set in, I had to hustle up and get moving.  I still had to wrangle up the kiddos and get them in the car (no small feat as any parents out there will attest to).

To make a long story short(er), I left the house without eating breakfast and was hungry.

Burger King Cheesy TotsI used all of the above as an attempt to justify some Cheesy Tot Goodness at Burger King (side note: has anyone else seen the BK commercial with the dude’s mattress talking to him?).

I dropped the kids off with my dad, and had my mind set on some Cheesy Tots.  I took my Symlin bolus as I got in the car and took off towards a nearby Burger King.   It took about 5-10 minutes to get there.  Once I got in the parking lot I remembered I had to make a phone call.  I ended up being on the phone longer than I thought, and by the time I got off it had been a solid 30 minutes since taking the Symlin.

You know what? I wasn’t hungry anymore.

The Cheesy Tots that I had been drooling over for the last hour didn’t even sound good anymore.  In fact, they sounded so “not good” that I wasn’t even interested in them.

So I left, completely in awe of the power of this hormone that I’ve been missing for so long.

(Please people, do NOT follow my example and skip breakfast.  It is bad, bad, bad for you.  Shame on me)

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Scott K. Johnson

Patient voice, speaker, writer, advocate. Living life with diabetes and telling my story. Patient Success Manager, USA for mySugr (All opinions expressed are my own and do not necessarily represent the position of my employer).

Diagnosed in April of 1980, I recognize the incredible mental struggle of living with diabetes. Read more…