My Magic Number

200My magic number is 200 mg/dl and above.

When my blood sugar is 200 mg/dl or higher, I fight some seriously strong cravings.  This is no new issue for me, but I still haven’t figured it out, or how to beat it.

These are no ordinary boredom, sleepy, munchy, emotionally upset cravings.  These are the high blood sugar cravings!  All of my usual tricks (drink water, chew gum, do a little exercise) are powerless against these cravings.

Honestly, I often end up caving in, taking more insulin (which is WAY too slow to help anyway), and satisfy my craving.  I feel a bit ashamed to admit that, but the truth is what it is.

I don’t understand why this happens, and would love for anybody to educate me.

My friend Chrissie (in Belgium) once said to me “fix the BG and you fix the hunger”.  She is so wise!  And it is true!  But so damn hard to do.

Try as I do, I see 200 mg/dl or higher way too often.  Food choices, timing, miscalculations, sickness, and all of the other things that we don’t know about, all work their mischeif on my blood sugar.  It is often very hard to just “fix it”, especially with how slow our “rapid” acting insulins are.

I think that the battle is one of time.  If I can fight the cravings for long enough to get my blood sugar down, then the craving leaves!  But there are times where my blood sugar is not minding its manners, and seems stuck, for hours.  How can a person possibly fight the cravings for so long?  It takes every ounce of mental strength, and some days there’s just not enough strength available.

Does anyone know why this happens?  How do you cope with it?

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Scott K. Johnson

Patient voice, speaker, writer, advocate. Living life with diabetes and telling my story. Patient Success Manager, USA for mySugr (All opinions expressed are my own and do not necessarily represent the position of my employer).

Diagnosed in April of 1980, I recognize the incredible mental struggle of living with diabetes. Read more…