Who’s Truth is True?

Thank you all for the outpouring of love and support as I crossed my 29th year of living with type 1 diabetes.  You all never fail to amaze me with the support you offer.

Wendy mentioned that it must have been weird reading through all of those old records, and she was right.

Picture of my old Doctor's notesBack in the “olden days”, doctors didn’t always have their notes transcribed, or use computers.  So one challenge was simply deciphering the crazy doctor handwriting!

But there was a lot more than that running through my head.  A big part of me was very scared to see what “The Doctors” had to say about me as I was growing up.

I don’t remember much about growing up with diabetes, but I when I think back on it, my feelings are of failure and not doing well or trying hard enough. An all time high A1C of 17.6 in August of 1988 (age 13) does nothing but confirm those feelings.

But when I read through my history according to the doctors, there is no judgment or measuring.  They did not talk about a young person driving himself straight to a life of complications and problems.

Instead, they talk about a young person who is highly motivated and energetically seeking all the help they had to offer.  Someone who is constantly pushing them to move to the next advancement in treatment. They talk about a young person who was not satisfied with where his A1C’s were, and who worked very hard to battle weight gain after changes in insulin therapies.

Wow.

How could their views be so different from mine?

Maybe this says a lot about how overly critical we are of ourselves?

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Scott K. Johnson

Patient voice, speaker, writer, advocate. Living life with diabetes and telling my story. Patient Success Manager, USA for mySugr (All opinions expressed are my own and do not necessarily represent the position of my employer).

Diagnosed in April of 1980, I recognize the incredible mental struggle of living with diabetes. Read more…