Stick with the glucose tabs

Cap'n_Crunch_regular_flavorWhat is it about Cap’n Crunch cereal that totally destroys the roof of your mouth?

I love cereal, but I don’t eat it too often. This is mostly because I have a heck of a time with portion control and accurately counting the carbs (see, I can’t eat just one bowl…).

I woke up low again last night. Seems like it’s been happening more often lately, so I’ve got to keep an eye on that. I think lows in general are hard to deal with, just because of all the physiological things that are happening in your body – emergency signals and instinctual urges to eat more than you need, etc.

So instead of having some glucose tabs (ie, the smart thing to do) I went down and had some Cap’n Crunch with milk. Ok, so maybe “some” is not the right word to use here. I thought I had about 6 servings, and bolused for that amount (letting the cozmo subtract from the dose to treat the low). Based on my blood sugar when I woke up in the morning, it was probably more like 7 or 8.

And my mouth hurts.

In my defense, 6,7 or 8 servings sounds like a lot of servings. It is. But lets also keep in mind that a single serving is 3/4 cup. My point here is that those servings can add up a lot faster than you would think.

Next time, I’ll stick with the glucose tabs. Especially because the low that woke me up was only a 68 – which is just below a comfortable number. I probably only needed perhaps two glucose tabs (8 carb grams), instead I went downstairs and had a couple hundred grams.

I think I’ll have to start using Kerri’s 8 sips plan if I decide not to use glucose tabs. On that note, Kerri & Wil, I would ask you to come up with a term we can add to the diabetes dictionary that describes the urges to eat everything in sight when dealing with a low. This might be hard for you Wil – with the lack of symptoms it’s probably much different for you…?

Maybe I’ll just stick with the glucose tabs…

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Scott K. Johnson

Patient voice, speaker, writer, advocate. Living life with diabetes and telling my story. Patient Success Manager, USA for mySugr (All opinions expressed are my own and do not necessarily represent the position of my employer).

Diagnosed in April of 1980, I recognize the incredible mental struggle of living with diabetes. Read more…