Fourth thing I hate about low blood sugars

Interruption.

I don’t care what it is you are doing, but if you have to stop to deal with a low blood sugar, you have been interrupted.

Even if I’m happily doing nothing, and get interrupted, it bothers me. What was I doing? Nothing!! But it still bothers me.

Worse though, is when I am doing something, or planning to do something.

Bunch of stop signs

Ellen commented on the second thing I hate about low blood sugars about how her son planned to go to karate class at 6:30. He planned early, tested his bg, ate, took less insulin all in preparation to be strong for class. Moments before they left, his bg was in the 60’s and all the plans came to a crashing halt. No way to get the BG up to where it needed to be in time for the rigorous exercise he planned for. So, he treated the low and stayed home. Once again disappointed by diabetes.

This too has happened to me. I’ve talked before about how far in advance I need to start planning and preparing for basketball – only to have to skip it because my blood sugar is too low shortly after starting. Situations like that, there is almost no way to get ahead of the curve – to get the bg rising and still have enough energy on board to sustain the bg during the hard workout of basketball. That really bummed me out, so I was very in touch with Ellen’s comment.

How about those of you who have had low blood sugars during important meetings or even interviews? I can remember posts about lows while on important phone calls as well. Or what about acting “strange” while out in public?

Yes, yes, yes and yes. I would definitely count those in the “interruptions” column.

Then there’s the whole fatigue thing afterwards.

Yes, interruptions are certainly another thing I hate about low blood sugars.

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Scott K. Johnson

Patient voice, speaker, writer, advocate. Living life with diabetes and telling my story. Patient Success Manager, USA for mySugr (All opinions expressed are my own and do not necessarily represent the position of my employer).

Diagnosed in April of 1980, I recognize the incredible mental struggle of living with diabetes. Read more…