It’s All Relative ( A Tale of The Perfect Blood Sugar )

image of a glucose meter displaying 104 mg/dl
104 mg/dl – just like the meter boxes and commercials!

It was a perfect blood sugar.  Absolutely perfect.  104 mg/dl.

Yet, as the meter beeped and the number showed on the screen, a muttered “mother fuck” escaped my lips.  The irony of it all struck me, and I would have grinned if I wasn’t so busy planning my next move.

My blood sugar well over an hour earlier was 133 mg/dl, and I had thrown a Snickers candy bar AND a Pearson’s Nut Roll down the hatch.

I was about 45 minutes away from stepping on the basketball court, and I was just not high enough or heading in the right direction.

I had been struggling with running nasty lows during this evening basketball, and quite honestly I never really figured it out this year.  Seemed like I was either running way too high, or fighting nasty lows.  Both of those suck major donkey butt when trying to compete.  Some other time I will go through all of the things I experimented with in search of the perfect recipe of variables.

I slammed down a can of Coke (leaded), brought a couple spares with me, and headed off to basketball.

As I was heading towards my car, chuckling to myself about being so upset about that “perfect” blood sugar, I knew I just had to blog about it.

The perfect blood sugar…  for a fasting reading or post meal check.  But not perfect at all for pre-exercise.  It’s a great example of how everything in our lives is so relative.

There is so much more that goes into each and every minute of our existence.

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Scott K. Johnson

Patient voice, speaker, writer, advocate. Living life with diabetes and telling my story. Patient Success Manager, USA for mySugr (All opinions expressed are my own and do not necessarily represent the position of my employer).

Diagnosed in April of 1980, I recognize the incredible mental struggle of living with diabetes. Read more…