All my highs…

I recently had an “aha!” moment.

I was recovering from an overnight high (472 mg/dl for the record) because I over treated a low the night before.

The “aha!” moment?  I realized (again) that all of my highs (and I mean my really high highs, like 300+) were from over treating lows.  This is something that I’ve talked about before, but apparently keep losing focus of.

I do go high for other reasons, but they are usually “moderate” highs.  Low to mid 200’s, or even high 200’s if I goof up my carb count enough.  But my really high highs, those are almost always explained by a low blood sugar that I over treated.

The crazy thing about those lows is that I’ll take a bunch of insulin along with that food I’m cramming down!  Just think of how many grams of carbs I’m eating if a massive meal bolus isn’t enough to offset them?  And how scary is it to take insulin while treating a low (when I may not be thinking clearly)?

So, once again, I am trying my best to avoid lows in order to avoid highs.  It’s the ones that happen during the night that get me because 1) I’m not awake to catch them before they get out of hand, and 2) I’m not awake to monitor for the crazy BG spike afterwards.

A topic for another post maybe, but why is it we have to keep “re-focusing” on things like this?  If I realized this way back when, why is it still causing me problems?

Another topic for another post is trying to avoid those lows – especially when we have so much less “fudge room” on that end of the blood sugar spectrum…

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Scott K. Johnson

Patient voice, speaker, writer, advocate. Living life with diabetes and telling my story. Patient Success Manager, USA for mySugr (All opinions expressed are my own and do not necessarily represent the position of my employer).

Diagnosed in April of 1980, I recognize the incredible mental struggle of living with diabetes. Read more…