Amy’s Food Scale!

Scale
Not actual food scale… 🙂

Amy over at www.diabetesmine.com posted recently about her new food scale.

This is something that has been around for a while, but I didn’t appreciate the concept then as I think I might now.

This type of scale comes with a database of foods. You put the food on the scale, punch in the code or look up the food, and it gives you (among other things) the total grams of carbohydrates.

One of the many major obstacles I fight with is the resistance to measure and count. I think it has something to do with getting all emotionally tied up around the so-called “serving size” and my desire to eat much more than that little amount. Or to eat in multiples so I can more easily calculate the carb grams.

Are you with me here?

With this type of scale, I would dish up what I want, punch in the code, and have an accurate count of the carbs. This gets me around the serving size mental roadblock, and gives me a very exact count. This is assuming the food I want is actually in the database.

One commenter, Jana, described actually being able to build a meal this way. Working the scale to “zero” out the previous items and adding the next.

I completely realize that this single item is not going to solve all of my food woes, but each helpful tool is a helpful tool right? I also realize that an accurate count of carb grams can help me match my insulin to those carbs, but it will not make the calories “go away”.

If anyone finds something that makes the calories just “go away” – please let me know.

Share this on:

Share on facebook
Share on twitter
Share on linkedin
guest

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

13 Comments
Newest
Oldest Most Voted
Inline Feedbacks
View all comments

Scott K. Johnson

Patient voice, speaker, writer, advocate. Living life with diabetes and telling my story. Patient Success Manager, USA for mySugr (All opinions expressed are my own and do not necessarily represent the position of my employer).

Diagnosed in April of 1980, I recognize the incredible mental struggle of living with diabetes. Read more…