In Sand Up To My Ears

Having spent the weekend with George and everyone that came to town for his celebration, I was an emotional basket-case.  I was riding a freaking tidal wave of emotions on the last day of my visit.

To have those fragile emotions rattled around like dice in a cup, then tossed out, one by one, into a coffin with Paul Conroy, was just a little too much for me to handle.

Confusion, terror, claustrophobia, panic, rage, humor, fear, logic, anger, sadness, dishonesty, love, hope, despair, surrender, honesty, survival, wit, limit, compassion, regret, surprise, encouragement.

Those are some of the things I felt and thought as I watched ‘Buried‘.  I could not believe how intense the movie was, and how my emotions were pulled from one thing to another, all inside a tiny coffin buried under a few feet of sand.  I was exhausted by the ending and cried at least 4 times.

I don’t want to give much away, as I’m hoping you’ll go see it.  It was well worth the ticket price and time spent.  Just be sure to go in strong, otherwise you’ll be a complete wreck coming out.

Buried was written by Kerri’s husband, Chris Sparling, which gave me good reason to like the movie.  In all honesty, I probably wouldn’t have gone to see it without that link.  I just don’t go to a lot of movies these days.  I’m mostly jobless, remember?

It was very special for me to be able to go with George to watch Chris’s movie, and the movie itself lived up to, and well beyond, my expectations for such a special event.

Dear Sparling family, just how much creativity is allowed in a single household anyway?

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Scott K. Johnson

Patient voice, speaker, writer, advocate. Living life with diabetes and telling my story. Patient Success Manager, USA for mySugr (All opinions expressed are my own and do not necessarily represent the position of my employer).

Diagnosed in April of 1980, I recognize the incredible mental struggle of living with diabetes. Read more…