Knowing When to Power Through

This is another post in my series of Powering Through the Extraordinary (first post here), where I’ve decided to add running into my exercise arsenal.

I’ve been sticking with a training program that I found through Runtastic (one of the exercise apps available for the iPhone), and so far things have been going well. I haven’t started enjoying running, but I’m not hating it either. And I feel great about myself once I’m finished, which is a pretty big deal.

Training days in June
Training days in June
Running stats for June
Running stats for June

I’ve also been playing basketball regularly, and I’m feeling better on the court because of the running. In fact, there have been a few days where I play basketball in the afternoon, then run in the evening. It might sound crazy, but if I’m stiff and sore from basketball, a good run will loosen me up and ease the pain. The more I move, the easier it is to keep moving.

Learning a new exercise with diabetes is tricky. Back in April I had a scary low while running. It was scary because I couldn’t tell if I was low or just tired from running. New exercises are just that — new! Things feel weird and different.

Low!But I’m starting to understand the difference. When I’m tired from the exercise itself, I can usually find a way to push through it and keep going. When I’m tired because I’m getting low, there’s just nothing I can do to keep going.

I’m learning that knowing when to power through is an important skill when exercising with diabetes.

**Disclosure: By participating in this program Accu-Chek will provide an Accu-Check Nano meter and test strips for a month, and P&G/Duracell will provide a heart rate monitor to aid in my training. I have agreed to post a few times talking about my experiences through the end of June. 

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Scott K. Johnson

Patient voice, speaker, writer, advocate. Living life with diabetes and telling my story. Patient Success Manager, USA for mySugr (All opinions expressed are my own and do not necessarily represent the position of my employer).

Diagnosed in April of 1980, I recognize the incredible mental struggle of living with diabetes. Read more…